Fumie's Sphere

Insights into the worlds of winemaking and nature

Feeling like May… April 26, 2017

Filed under: At The Winery,Nature — Thorpe Vineyard @ 10:19 pm
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Sour cherries in the backyard are in bloom while honeysuckles’ leaves grow larger every day in this last week of April — it already feels like May. The grapes are nearing to bud break; perhaps any time for Maréchal Foch, always the first to turn green in my vineyards. After observing the grape buds with the watchful eyes, I see the flowers and the wind that trembles them, and the endless blue sky sparkling overhead.

 

 

 

 

Annular Solar Eclipse of May 1994 March 28, 2017

Filed under: Nature — Thorpe Vineyard @ 12:53 am
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Believe it or not, there was an annular solar eclipse visible from right here on May 10, 1994.  I was out of college a few years prior to it, and the construction of our current Tasting Room was nearing its completion. Our season used to start on Memorial Day weekend so it was still pretty quiet around here that time of the year, especially on weekdays. I was working in the wine cellar waiting for the totality of the eclipse. I had an access to a welder’s protective lens — a piece of very deeply tinted glass that was meant for being installed on a welder’s helmet to keep their vision safe from the sparks they would produce while working in their shop. It was dark enough to safely observe the sun as well. I walked in and out from the tank room to the driveway every so often while working on the wine to follow the progress of the eclipse with the piece of the glass in my hand.  When the totality arrived, I saw the thin ring of the sun through the lens and the shadows of myself on the gravel. A few days later I wrote the following for the memorable moment I was fortunate to have. Now another solar eclipse is coming this August, and I will of course use the same piece of the glass to observe the sun again.

 

annular_eclipse.pngAnnular Solar Eclipse

Beneath the sky
in the marvelous shine
the shadows are in layers
as they move.
At high noon
I look up at the phenomenon,
that, perhaps,
happens only once
in my lifetime here.

 

The First Day of Spring March 20, 2017

Filed under: Chimney Bluffs,Drift Ice,Nature,Sodus Bay — Thorpe Vineyard @ 1:11 pm
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Sodus Bay is still frozen from the snow storm last week. But the trees are carrying the well-swollen buds on their branches.

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A short stroll around the Chimney Bluffs. The inclined sun is shining through the treetops.

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The drift ice is on shore where the gentle breeze and the water are all what to be heard.

Though still chilly, it’s good to welcome the arrival of spring 2017.

 

Fox in the Yard Today February 28, 2017

Filed under: At The Winery,Nature — Thorpe Vineyard @ 3:03 pm
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Just looked out the front door, and guess what I found in my yard…

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Bluebirds’ Visit February 24, 2017

Filed under: At The Winery,Nature — Thorpe Vineyard @ 3:00 am
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A pair of eastern bluebirds ready to investigate the cleaned bluebird box in the Vineyard.

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Now he is looking into it — literally.

I thought I saw them in this balmy weather — that’s right.  I have to go and clean their homes.  So I walked out to the North Vineyard and removed the debris from last summer that was left in two bluebird boxes on my vineyard posts.  As it was such a nice day, I was brought out further into the Old and East Vineyards for a stroll.  Probably half an hour later I came back closer to the bluebird boxes.  I was slowly walking from vine to vine to see how they were doing.  Then one moment I happened to look up to find a pair of bluebirds checking on one of the newly cleaned boxes out there.  — Yes, it’s your home if you like.  They saw me and paused for a while, then started to fly away as I walked closer to them.  That’s OK; I will see you there this summer raising your kids again like a few years ago.  — I hope. 

 

 

Open the North Window March 24, 2016

Filed under: Nature — Thorpe Vineyard @ 3:56 pm
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I have my desk along the north wall of my house, and there is a window not too far from where I sit and work. I have a pair of thick curtains on all the windows in my house that I like to keep open during the day and close at sundown regardless the weather. However, when I quit using a wood-stove several years ago, I found out how drafty my house could get in winter — the massive heat of the wood-stove was covering up that fact. Naturally I started to keep the curtains closed when it was cold outside, especially the ones on the window on the north wall that was almost next to me. They didn’t quite stop all the chills, but were better than nothing. Consequently, I learned to keep this pair closed during the winter.

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Snow Drops for you that usually fade before we open for the season…

Though it remained relatively mild this winter, I kept the curtains on the north window closed. When the balmy weather suddenly arrived a couple of weeks ago, I stood right next to this window one morning and thought about a moment, then pulled the string to open the curtains. The light rushed in and made the whole house brighter. I could see a few starlings perching in the red maple tree next door above the Winery Barn.

I instantly recalled the kigo, a word or term that must be included to describe a season in a Japanese haiku; “Open the North Window” (if it were English) is used to indicate the haiku is about spring. They used to (or maybe even now in some regions) close up any openings, windows and sometimes doors, on the north side of their houses to prevent the winter cold to sneak in. They often literally nailed some boards to close them tight. Once the spring arrived, they went out to remove the shields that kept them warm but dark during the winter. I thought I understood their joy to let the light come in again and the relief that the bitter winter was finally over.

The vernal equinox is behind us and the sun has started his trek north to the summer solstice. There is the period every summer when the setting sun over the Lake can be seen from this north window while I sit around. That’s what, of course, I’m looking forward to now.

 

 

Crescent Moon January 14, 2016

The first invasion of the polar vortex of the season to Northeast was taking place earlier this week. The frigid air mass travels over the open water of the Great Lakes causing the formation of significant lake effect snow bands. If you are on the leeward of this air flow, you’d be getting feet of snow in no time.

Many of you ask us how often we get buried in the deep snow after seeing our proximity to Lake Ontario while visiting our Tasting Room. The answer is “not much”; at least not as often as you might expect.

The heavy snow fall occurs most often when the air travels the longest fetch of the Lakes: longer the path, more moisture supply for the snow bands from the Lakes. Thus typically the heaviest lake effect snow episodes occur with the westerly airflow to the east of the Lakes. So for us here the lake effect snow becomes an issue when the wind direction changes more toward northwest.

This Monday the weather pattern was a textbook case of the heavy lake effect snow to the east of the Lakes behind a strong arctic cold front. I saw the Lake Ontario band over the Lake a little offshore from us with lots of whitecaps surging toward the shoreline. I turned back to the vineyards and saw the Lake Erie band above the horizon. In between there was sunshine all day long with a few stray clouds every now and then though it was windy and pretty cold.

crescentmoonAt the end of the day the thin Crescent Moon was above the Drumlin when I walked out to pick up the day. The sun was already behind the Drumlin and the western sky was bright in the evening glow from the horizon to the mid sky. The Moon appeared to have started to be laid back — when you see a crescent moon, it looks either standing up straight in fall or laid back in spring, or in the transition phases in between. In the piercing west winds in the middle of the lake effect snow bands I was confident to have found a sign of the coming spring.

 

 
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