Fumie's Sphere

Insights into the worlds of winemaking and nature

Fialka Story II April 29, 2015

Filed under: At The Winery — Thorpe Vineyard @ 8:37 pm
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Trillium at the Chimney Bluffs

trilliums at the Chimney Bluffs

“What does ‘Fialka’ mean?”

That is probably the most asked question in our tasting room for all these years. It’s a name of a flower in Slovak, as well as in many other Slavic languages, meaning “violet” in English. The original name of this wine was “Trillium” that we lost after having a trademark debate against a winery in Midwest in 1995. For the full story, click here to visit my Blog.

Today I had errands to take care of so went out for a ride. The season is still so much behind this year after having one of the coldest winters in history. But the signs of spring can be seen everywhere so as I drove by, I looked up at the hillside of the Drumlin. As I expected, there were no trillium blossoms yet, but I did see the swelling flower buds on those little plants close to the ground. Maybe we’ll start seeing the open flowers by this weekend if the warmth will really reach here.

Single_Western_trillium

Fully Bloomed Trillium

It seems that ferns are out and growing on the hillside and the tiny yellow flowers are in bloom on witch hazels in the marsh across from the hill. — I’ve believed those are witch hazels for a long time, but I might be wrong. Every spring I think of the innocence of flowers. They bloom, fade and fall while sharing what they can be. Perhaps that’s the way I wish to be.

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Fialka Story

Filed under: At The Winery — Thorpe Vineyard @ 8:34 pm
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“Trillium” was created by the request for the sweeter styled wines, and was first released in July, 1994 when the construction of our Wine Shop was completed. Its abundant flavor of fresh grapes and mild sweeter taste gained the popularity very quickly, and it was sold out by the end of 1994.

In July 1995 a mail arrived from a winery in Midwest claiming that the name “Trillium” was theirs as they had registered that name as a trade mark of one of their wines. After a short debate we decided to change the name of this beloved wine. We asked for a suggestion of a new name for this wine through our newsletters as a form of “contest” — if we chose the name you gave to us, you’d get a free case of the wine with the new label!

FialkaDuring the holiday season of 1995 Fumie’s old college professor visited us with his family and one of her classmates. When he walked in, he immediately saw the bottle of Trillium on display on our tasting counter. He took it in his hands and said, “So, is this the troubled wine?” He already knew about the debate from the newsletter we’d mailed out. As soon as he said so, his cousin from Slovakia exclaimed, “Oh, that’s Fialka!” We all turned our heads toward him as the name he yelled sounded very nice for a name of the wine. We told him to officially write the name down onto a piece of paper that we had ready for the visitors to write in their suggested new names for the wine. He told us that the illustration of the trilliums on the label reminded him of the flowers they call “fialka” in Slovakia. Following spring when we had the new labels ready, he took a case of the brand new Fialka wine back home to Slovakia.

Over the years we’ve learned that “fialka” means “violet” in English, and fairly common in the Slavic languages such as Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, etc. If you have the relatives or friends who came from that direction, ask them if they know the word and its meaning. Most likely they do!

The composition of Fialka has remained basically the same over these years. Diamond contributes the abundant fresh grape taste and flavor while Catawba gives it the spiciness and good acid to counterpart the sweetness. Cayuga White then somehow mediates the entire package to the subtle mildness — that’s the way we feel. The name “Trillium” was originally chosen as the wine was a blend of these three varieties about the same portion of each.

Now you’ve got the story, so get a bottle or two to bring back home to enjoy!

 

Voice of Spring April 8, 2015

Two years in a row we experienced a frigid winter. This year it came with the honor of February 2015 being the coldest month in history in much of the eastern U.S. It was cold indeed, but while being busy with lots of paperwork and shoveling the snow, it went away like a dream.

In March I did three watercolor paintings that will become the new labels this year. I introduced my old customer-friend who gave me his painting in the last newsletter. Perhaps he motivated me to pick up my brushes again this winter. It was fun that came with new learning. I’m now so thrilled to put the new labels on the bottles in the next month or so. As usual they had to go through the approval process by the Federal agency, and I just got it a few days ago. Now it’s time to bring them to the printer.

Snow has mostly receded from the vineyards. It’s time to get out there and start moving. Red-tailed hawks and crows are arguing who will get the spot on the telephone pole. I would rather listen to the finches and cardinals chat — I’m now waiting to hear the loud killdeers overhead and in the twilight the nasal whispers of wood thrushes and nighthawks in the wood.

 

 
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